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Atrophic Acne Scars Treatment – Microneedling Atrophic Facial Scars

atrophic acne scars treatment

This is a summary of an objective assessment of microneedling therapy for the treatment of atrophic acne scars.

Background

Atrophic facial scars are difficult to treat, particularly when they are deep and occur on the face. Microneedling or dermaroller therapy is a new addition to the collection of treatments for such scars that offer effective, simple and reportedly substantial management of these scars.

Aims

The aim of the present study was to perform an objective evaluation of the efficacy of microneedling atrophic acne scars treatment of varying etiology.

Materials and Methods

Thirty-seven patients of atrophic facial scarring were offered multiple sittings of atrophic acne scars treatment by Dermapen (treatment and their scars were evaluated and graded clinically and by serial photography at the start as well as at two months after the conclusion of the treatment protocol. Any change in the grading of scars after the end of treatment and follow-up period was noted down. The patients were also asked to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment received on a 1-10 point scale. The efficacy of micro-needling treatment was thus assessed both subjectively by the patients as well as objectively by a single observer.

Results

Overall 36 out of the total of 37 patients completed the treatment schedule and were evaluated for its efficacy. Out of these 36 patients, 34 achieved a reduction in the severity of their scarring by one or two grades. More than 80% of patients assessed their treatment as ‘excellent’ on a 10-point scale. No significant adverse effects were noted in any patient.

Conclusions

Microneedling therapy seems to be a simple and effective treatment option for the management of atrophic acne scars treatment.

Atrophic acne scars treatment: An Objective Assessment, US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, J Cutan Aesthet Surg. 2009 Jan-Jun; 2(1): 26–30. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2840919/